EINAV VAISMAN

CH.89: If you were to categorize or describe the style of your artwork, what would it be and why?

EV: My style is character-based with an emphasis on geometrical shapes and bright color palettes.

CH.89: Where do you draw your inspiration from?

EV: Since characters are central in my pieces, I find my inspiration in interesting and peculiar people I meet in my everyday life. Inspiring people can be found in the most mundane places like on the bus, in the supermarket etc. Some people just peek your interest and you kind of wonder what’s this person’s story. I also look at ancient native American, African and Asian art for character inspiration.

CH.89: Can you talk a little bit about what your creative thought process is like when starting a new project/ piece of artwork?

EV: Honestly, it all starts by grabbing some sweets, it could be chocolate, candies or shakes, everything works really. I then continue by researching the subject of the piece and try to find an interesting situation I can depict in order to make the main points of the work come across to the viewer. If this is a commissioned piece then the format will establish the geometric shapes I will use, for example an elongated format will result in elongated, usually rectangular shaped characters.

CH.89: Is there anything in particular that you would want people to take from your artwork?

EV: I want to convey the atmosphere in a certain scene and allow people to understand the feelings of the participating characters.

CH.89: Can you talk a little bit about your lifestyle as an artist and what that is like?

EV: I’m a freelance illustrator so in addition to spending many hours working on illustrations I also spend a lot of time searching for potential projects and commissioned work. I live in Tel-Aviv, which is a central metropolis in Israel, whenever I’m out I try to look at different social situations and different people to get inspired. And since illustration requires so much time in my home office, I recently took a part-time job in an unrelated field just to mix things up a bit.

CH.89: When starting out an artistic task, do you think it is better to have a particular direction/set plan guiding your way? Or, is it better to act on impulse and go from there?

EV: I think it is important to look at illustration as a multi-phased, complex project in which each phase might require a different strategy. For example, the initial research stage is very meticulous. I read, get familiar with the subject and look for references which I do in a very orderly, almost algorithmic manner. When I get down to the first sketch, I allow myself to get carried away by impulses and ideas that spring into my head. In this stage planning is important but never to the point where it stifles the artistic fluidity.

CH.89: What is one major lesson you’ve learned as an artist thus far?

EV: I learned that I have to accept the fact that I will change as an artist. As time passes and you create more art pieces you will not only become better, you will also become different. That variation will be present in your style and in your visual language. For an artist who worked hard to establish a style of her own that can be a bit intimidating but also holds a great promise for growth and innovation.

CH.89: Do you regard personal style & taste to be of highest importance?

EV: I think that when you look for inspiration or when you review the works of fellow artists it is important to remember that art can be genuine, interesting and high quality, even if it falls outside of your personal taste. I think learning to appreciate works that are not exactly what you would consider your style is a key aspect in artistic growth.

CH.89: What do you consider to be the hardest thing about being an artist?

EV: It can be quite frustrating that many patrons don’t view illustration as a profession but rather as a hobby. It makes it so much harder to agree upon a price and the scope of the work.

CH.89: What is one thing you love about being an artist?

EV: I feel that after each illustration my world is richer, and I know more about the world and the people in it. I get familiar with different places, cultures and artworks through the illustration process.

CH.89: Is there anyone in particular, any artist’s that inspire you in any way?

EV: I like Assaf Benharroch, Robert Frank Hunter and Eleanor Davis since they tend to use interesting patterns, vivid colors, interesting compositions and characters in their illustrations.

CH.89: What do you think of technology in terms of being a useful tool for artists today?

EV: Technology is very useful not only for creating art but also for exposure. I think that social media is a great way to get familiar with other artists which makes us more informed and ultimately, makes us better artists. Also, let’s not forget the greatest tool of all – Command Z.

CH.89: Do you think being an artist allows you to view the world differently from those who don’t follow creative paths?

EV: Definitely. Art enhances your attention to details and puts you in an inspiration-seeking mode all the time.

CH.89: Do you enjoy traveling? If so, do you have a favorite city?

EV: My favorite city happens to be my home town Tel-Aviv! But I have great memories from Sintra in Portugal. There’s no place like Portugal! If you go there you will understand.

CH.89: Do you have a favorite author or book?

EV: I like Panther, a comic by Brecht Evens. I like the surreal story and how the style, colors and patterns compliment the story perfectly. It is also completely different from what I do.

CH.89: Any future goals or plans for your artwork?

EV: In a few years’ time I want to look back at my previous work and be genuinely surprised by how far I’ve come and how I’ve transformed and grown as an artist. I want to be continually involved in personal and commissioned projects.

CH.89: What does being an artist mean to you?

EV: I value greatly the ability of the artist to allow the audience to view a situation from a different perspective.

CH.89: What’s the last song you listened to?

EV: Pine & ginger by Amindi K. Fro$t, Tessellated & Valleyz. A great nu-reggae track with beautiful, mellow electronic elements.

CH.89: Any last words on the aesthetic of your artwork?

EV: Continue to be creative and curious.

CHECK OUT MORE ON: EINAV VAISMAN

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